Handrails for Ramps & Stairs

Stair and ramp handrails must meet the following characteristics:

 

1. Stairs and ramps with a change in level greater than 500 mm must have continuous handrails on both sides with a 300 mm horizontal extension at its ends. 
2. When the stair widths are greater than 2100 mm an additional intermediate handrail should be installed. The width between intermediate handrails should be at most 2100 mm.
3. In ramps, the distance between the handrails shall be 1000 mm.
4. The handrail should be mounted at a height of 900 mm. An additional handrail shall be provided at a height between 650 mm and 750 mm.
5. The handrails must be safely secured. Handrails must have an anatomical design that allows adjustment to the hand with a circular section of 30 mm to 40 mm
diameter or an equivalent gripping surface. Handrails must be separated from the wall surface at least 40 mm. The handrail section and its mounting system should not interfere with the continuous gripping surface.
6. Handrails must have a contrasted reflectance of at least 30 points LRV against its background.
7. All handrail materials exposed to sun radiation shall not reach temperatures that
may damage the users.

Relevant Guidance

LCH1
LCH2

LCH1

300 mm horizontal extension at its ends

LCH2

Presence of intermediate handrail for stairs to keep distance of at most 2100mm

LCH3
LCH3
LCH4
LCH4

LCH3

Mounted at height of 900mm

LCH2

Additional handrail at a height between 650 – 750mm

 

LCH5

LCH5

The distance between both sides of handrails is 1000mm

LCH6
LCH6
LCH7
LCH8
LCH9

LCH6

Rounded section of 30 – 40 mm separated from the wall with a distance ≥40m

LCH7

Handrails designed to allow continuity of gripping without interfering its mounting system

LCH8

Contrast of 30 LRV against its background

LCH9

Handrails made of comfortable materials against heat and coldness

Glossary of Terms

Ramps are inclined surfaces that join different levels of a space. Commonly used at the entrances of buildings to accommodate level changes, ramps provide building access to wheelchair users. The maximum slope of a ramp is calculated to provide comfortable and easy access to the building.

This is the measurement of the incline of the ramp’s surface. The steeper the gradient, the more difficult it will be to travel up for some people and the more risk of falls when wet. The shallower the gradient, the easier it is to walk or use a wheelchair. 

A ramp is comprised of horizontal sloped ramp runs which are the inclined sections that allow changes in level to be achieved comfortably. Ramp runs are connected by level landings which allow users to stop and take a rest. 

A ramp is comprised of horizontal sloped ramp runs which are the inclined sections that allow changes in level to be achieved comfortably. Ramp runs are connected by level landings which allow users to stop and take a rest. 

Truncated domes in a grid pattern to provide a tactile surface under feet of blind users. They are used as a used as a warning of upcoming level changes or obstacles on the course of travel.

Pendulum test value (PTV) is a measurement of the slip resistance of a floor surface, either an external or internal floor of a building. The least slip resistance a surface material is, the more likely people may skid or trip, especially in wet conditions. In average circumstances, slip-resistance is as follows:

0-18 = very low slip-resistance.

18-25 = moderate slip-resistance.

25-36 = good slip resistance.

Tactile pavements are textured surfaces with contrasted colour that are perceptible and identifiable by feel or cane or residual functional vision that warns or informs people with visual disabilities.

Tools and Templates

Changing Levels
Ramp Design
Approaching Buildings

Relevant Guidance